Today in History: The Greyhound Bus Company

 

 

Today in History: The Greyhound Bus Company
100 years ago today, the Greyhound Bus Company began its operations in Hibbing, Minnesota. Its Swedish founder, Carl Eric Wickman, had moved to the United States in 1905. After being laid off from work in the mines, Wickman unsuccessfully tried his luck as a Hupmobile salesman. In 1914, as a last resort, Wickman used his remaining 7-passenger car as a shuttle for miners. He took them from Hibbing to Alice (known for its saloons) and charged 15 cents per ride. A year later, Wickman joined forces with Ralph Bogan, who was running a transit service from Hibbing to Duluth, Minnesota. The Greyhound Bus Company was born (it was named Mesaba Transportation Company at the time). The buses were dubbed “greyhounds” because of their gray paint and sleek appearance. By the end of 1918, Wickman owned 18 buses earning $40,000 a year. By 1927, buses traveled across the entire USA. The running dog was first used as the company’s logo in 1929. By then, the company was called Greyhound Lines.

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