Today in History: Ben Shahn born in 1898

Today in History: Ben Shahn born in 1898

Ben Shahn (September 12, 1898 – March 14, 1969) was an American painter and graphic artist whose work displayed a combination of realism and abstraction, thus addressing various social and political causes. Shahn immigrated with his family to New York City in 1906. In 1913–17 he worked as a lithographer’s apprentice while attending high school at night. He later attended New York University, City College of New York, and the National Academy of Design in New York. During travels to Europe in 1925 and 1927 he saw the works of the Old Masters. In 1933 Shahn enrolled in the New York City Public Works Art Project and executed a series of works on the Prohibition era. From 1935 to 1938 he worked for the Farm Security Administration as an artist and photographer.
Shahn and his wife, Bernarda Brysen, executed a series of panels for the lobby of the Bronx post office in New York in 1938–39, a project that took the form of a geographic panorama of American life. Beginning in the mid-1950s, his work became more reflective and less concerned with social criticism. Source: britannica.com

Inquiries about this original, vintage poster at mail@posterconnection.com

#BenShahn #PosterArt #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #art #paper #graphic #graphics #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #originalposter #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #graphicdesign #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

Advertisements

Today in History: United States nicknamed Uncle Sam

Today in History: United States nicknamed Uncle Sam

On this day in 1813, the United States gets its nickname, Uncle Sam. The name is linked to Samuel Wilson, a meat packer from Troy, New York, who supplied barrels of beef to the United States Army during the War of 1812.Wilson (1766-1854) stamped the barrels with “U.S.” for United States, but soldiers began referring to the grub as “Uncle Sam’s.” The local newspaper picked up on the story and Uncle Sam eventually gained widespread acceptance as the nickname for the U.S. federal government.

Source: http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/united-states-nicknamed-uncle-sam

Inquiries about this original, vintage poster at posterconnection@gmail.com

#UncleSam #USA #PosterArt #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #art #paper #graphic #graphics #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #posterconnection #originalposter #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #graphicdesign #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

Today in History: First World War erupts in Europe in 1914

First World War erupts in Europe in 1914

On August 1, 1914, four days after Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia, two more great European powers—Russia and Germany—declare war on each other; the same day, France orders a general mobilization. The so-called “Great War” that ensued would be one of unprecedented destruction and loss of life, resulting in the deaths of some 20 million soldiers and civilians and the physical devastation of much of the European continent.

The event that was widely acknowledged to have sparked the outbreak of World War I occurred on July 28, 1914, when Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austro-Hungarian Empire, was shot to death with his wife by the Bosnian Serb nationalist Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo. Over the weeks that followed, Austria-Hungary blamed the Serbian government for the attack, hoping to use the incident as justification for settling the problem of Slavic nationalism in the tumultuous Balkans region once and for all. However, as Russia supported Serbia, an Austria-Hungary declaration of war was delayed until its leaders received assurances from German leader Kaiser Wilhelm II that Germany would support their cause in the event of a Russian intervention. This assurance came on July 5; Austria-Hungary subsequently sent an ultimatum to the Serbian government on July 23 and demanded its acceptance within two days at the risk of war. Though Serbia accepted all but two of the ultimatum’s terms, and Russia declared its intention to back Serbia in the case of such a conflict, Austria-Hungary went ahead with its war declaration against Serbia on July 28, one month after the assassinations.

With that declaration, the tenuous peace between Europe’s great powers was shattered: Germany warned Russia, still only partially mobilized, that to continue to full mobilization against Austria-Hungary would mean war with Germany. While insisting that Russia immediately halt mobilization, Germany began its own mobilization; when the Russians refused the German demands, Germany declared war on the czarist empire on August 1. That same day, Russia’s ally, France, long suspicious of German aggression, began its own mobilization, urging Great Britain—the third member, along with France and Russia, of the Triple Entente alliance—to declare its support. A divided British government declined to do so initially, but events soon precipitated Britain’s move towards war as well. On August 2, the first German army units crossed into Luxembourg as part of a long-planned German strategy to invade France through neutral Belgium. France and Germany declared war against each other on August 3; that night, Germany invaded Belgium, prompting Great Britain to declare war on Germany.

For the most part, the people of Europe greeted the outbreak of war with jubilation. The great majority of people—within government and without—assumed that their country would be victorious within months, and could not envision the possibility of a longer conflict. By the end of 1914, however, well over a million soldiers of various nationalities had been killed on the battlefields of Europe, and there was no final victory in sight for either the Allies or the Central Powers. On the Western Front—the battle line that stretched across northern France and Belgium—the combatants settled down in the trenches for a terrible war of attrition, which would continue, in Europe and other corners of the world, for the next four years.

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/first-world-war-erupts-in-europe

Inquiries about this original, vintage poster at posters@posterconnection.com

#WorldWarI #WorldWar #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #originalposter #poster #posters #design #graphicdesign #art #paper #graphic #graphics #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

Happy 4th of July!

Happy 4th of July!

Inquiries about this original, vintage poster at posters@posterconnection.com

#4thofJuly #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #originalposter #poster #posters #design #graphicdesign #art #paper #graphic #graphics #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

Today is National Auctioneers Day

Today is National Auctioneers Day

We simply could not resist: Going once … Going twice … SOLD ! National Auctioneers Day is observed every year on the third Saturday in April. According to the National Auctioneers Association, it is estimated nearly a quarter-trillion dollars in goods and services are sold by professional auctioneers each year. The sales method is over 2,000 years old; in the United States, it developed during the Civil War. The rapidly punctuated chatter of some auctioneers not only gets the job done but can make it entertaining as well. Across the country, auction houses offer anything from livestock to automobiles. Sometimes, some very bizarre (and often quite expensive) items might surface, incl. a false set of Winston Churchill’s teeth that fetched over $23,000 back in 2010.

We just stick to vintage posters for now and hope you will join us for our April 28 sale. Happy bidding. The poster will be offered in our April 28 auction. For inquiries, email posterconnection@gmail.com.

#VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #art #poster #posters #design #graphicdesign #paper #graphic #graphics #originalposter #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA

Today in History: Joseph Christian Leyendecker was born today in 1874

Today in History: Joseph Christian Leyendecker was born today in 1874

Leyendecker was born in Montabaur, Germany, and immigrated with his family to Chicago, Illinois, at the age of 8. Showing an early interest in painting, he got his first job at the age of 16 in a Chicago engraving house on the strength of some large pictures he had painted on kitchen oilcloth. In the evenings after work, he studied drawing and anatomy under John H. Vanderpoel at the Chicago Art Institute. Years later, he and his brother Frank Xavier enrolled in the Academie Julian in Paris.

Upon their return, the brothers moved to New York, then the center of American commercial art, advertising, and publishing. As a thoroughly trained artist with immense technical facility, Leyendecker had no difficulty in obtaining top commissions for advertising illustrations and cover designs for leading publications.

He found a niche in fashion and merchandise advertising in the 1920s, producing commissioned pieces for companies Interwoven Socks, Kellogg, Hartmarx, B. Kuppenheimer & Co., and Cluett Peabody & Company, who famously hired him to develop a series of images of the Arrow brand of shirt collars. Leyendecker’s images came to define the fashionable American man of the early 20th century.

At the apex of his career, Leyendecker was considered one of the pre-eminent commercial American artists. It is said that his technical skill was beyond reproach, he worked amazingly fast, and that his draftsmanship was perfect. Norman Rockwell at one time considered Leyendecker his primary mentor, as he heavily influenced Rockwell’s early style and was a true master illustrator of the 20th century.

By the end of his career, Leyendecker was a noted American illustrator and graphic designer who, between 1896 and 1950, had painted more than 400 magazine covers, most of them of an idealized America. He painted his first Post cover in 1899 and executed 321 more during the next 40 years.

Source: http://www.saturdayeveningpost.com.

The USA Bonds World War I poster will be offered in our April 28 auction. For inquiries, email posterconnection@gmail.com.

#Leyendecker #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #art #poster #posters #design #graphicdesign #paper #graphic #graphics #originalposter #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

Tomorrow (March 11) is Daylight Savings Time.

Tomorrow (March 11) is Daylight Savings Time.

As we start Daylight Savings Time at 2 am on March 11 here in the United States, many of us will miss that lost hour of sleep for the next several weeks. At least your afternoons and evenings will be lighter a little longer.

#DaylightSavings #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #art #poster #posters #design #graphicdesign #paper #graphic #graphics #originalposter #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA