Today in History: World Premiere of 2001: A Space Odyssey in 1968

Today in History: World Premiere of 2001: A Space Odyssey in 1968

Stanley Kubrick’s epic about human evolution, technology, and extraterrestrial life has polarized audiences and critics alike. Today, it is widely regarded as one of the greatest and most influential films ever made.

For inquiries, email posterconnection@gmail.com.

#SpaceOdyssey #StanleyKubrick #PosterArt #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #art #paper #graphic #graphics #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #originalposter #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #graphicdesign #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

Today in History: The Premiere of the “Blue Angel”

 

Today in History: The Premiere of the “Blue Angel” in 1930

90 years ago today, , the German movie Der Blaue Engel (The Blue Angel) celebrated its premiere in Berlin and introduced the world to a new movie star, Marlene Dietrich. The opening was completely sold out, possibly helped by rumors that the movie may not have been allowed to be shown at all due to its disreputable plot: a disciplinarian professor falling for a cabaret singer.

Josef von Sternberg was brought in from Hollywood to be the film’s director; Emil Jannings, who had just won an Oscar, was hired to play the professor. But filling the role of cabaret singer Lola-Lola turned out to be more problematic. Sternberg wanted Metropolis star, Brigitte Helm but she was booked; Jannings preferred theater singer Lucie Mannheim but Sternberg considered her too serious. Author Heinrich Mann would have liked to have seen his girlfriend Trude Hesterberg in the role but she was not sufficiently well-known.

Enter Marlene Dietrich. Supposedly, Sternberg was immediately fascinated by this inexperienced woman from a local drama school. It seems that the young Dietrich embodied Lola-Lola, a seductress with the longest legs and the right smile. It is said that Dietrich did not even prepare a song for her first audition, telling Sternberg that she assumed she would not be seriously considered for the role. Her flippant behavior intrigued the director and because Dietrich was behaving like the film character Lola Lola, she was hired.

Nobody could have predicted the film’s enormous success. A new star was born and immediately following the triumphant premiere in Berlin, the blue angel and her director went off to pursue a career in Hollywood.

For inquiries, email posterconnection@gmail.com.

#MarleneDietrich #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #art #poster #posters #design #graphicdesign #paper #graphic #graphics #originalposter #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

Happy 90th Birthday, Günther Kieser !

Happy 90th Birthday, Günther Kieser !

Günther Kieser was born in 1930 in Kronberg, near Frankfurt. Trained at the Werkkunstschule in Offenbach, Kieser began his career as a free-lance artist in 1949 and founded a studio with Hans Michel in 1952. The two artists worked on projects for the German Mail Service and the Hesse radio network and started creating posters for Lippmann & Rau, founders of the first German Jazz concert agencies. Over the next decade, Kieser and Michel would design posters for the concerts by Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Count Basie, Oscar Peterson, and John Coltrane.

When his partnership with Michel ended in 1962, Kieser continued to work primarily for Lippmann & Rau, producing posters that would become fixtures in the music scene. His posters were displayed in concert halls, bars and on billboards. The artist is perhaps most famous for his 1969 Jimi Hendrix Experience poster which became a symbol for a new generation.

Kieser joined the Deutscher Werkbund (German Work Federation) in 1956 and became a member of the Alliance Graphique Internationale (AGI) in 1964. In 1981, he became a professor for Visual Communication at the Bergische Universität in Wuppertal, a position he held until 1992. Kieser has won numerous international awards, his work has been exhibited worldwide and his posters are part of every important museum collection..

For inquiries, email posterconnection@gmail.com.

#Kieser #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #art #poster #posters #design #graphicdesign #paper #graphic #graphics #originalposter #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

Today in History: Lucian Bernhard born in 1883

Today in History: Lucian Bernhard born in 1883

Lucian Bernhard (March 15, 1883 – May 29, 1972) was a German graphic and type designer during the first half of the twentieth century. He was influential in helping create the design style known as Plakatstil (Poster Style), which used reductive imagery and flat-color as well as Sachplakat (‘object poster’) which restricted the image to advertising simply the object and its brand name. Among his most famous works were poster designs for Stiller shoes, Manoli cigarettes, and Priester matches.

#LucianBernhard #PosterArt #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #art #paper #graphic #graphics #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #originalposter #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #graphicdesign #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

Today is #NationalJewelDay

Today is #NationalJewelDay

National Jewel Day is observed annually on March 13, celebrating brilliant gems of all shapes, sizes, cuts, and colors. While the origins of this holiday are unknown, we can take a wild guess that a jeweler or gal came up with the idea.

For inquiries, email posterconnection@gmail.com.

#jewelry #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #art #poster #posters #design #graphicdesign #paper #graphic #graphics #originalposter #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA

Today in History: Bombing of Dresden in 1945

Today in History: Bombing of Dresden in 1945

75 years ago today, a series of Allied firebombing raids begins against the German city of Dresden, reducing the “Florence of the Elbe” to rubble and flames, and killing as many as 135,000 people. It was the single most destructive bombing of the war—including Hiroshima and Nagasaki—and all the more horrendous because little, if anything, was accomplished strategically since the Germans were already on the verge of surrender.

Among the conclusions reached at the February 1945 Yalta Conference of the Allied powers was the resolution that the Allies would engage in concerted strategic bombing raids against German cities known for war-production and manufacturing, in an effort to bring the Nazi war machine to a crashing halt. The tragic irony of the raid on Dresden, a medieval city renowned for its rich artistic and architectural treasures, is that during the war it had never been a site of war-production or major industry. Both Allies and Germans alike have argued over the real purpose of the firebombing; the ostensible “official” rationale was that Dresden was a major communications center and bombing it would hamper the German ability to convey messages to its army, which was battling Soviet forces at the time. But the extent of the destruction was, for many, disproportionate to the stated strategic goal—many believe that the attack was simply an attempt to punish the Germans and weaken their morale.

More than 3,400 tons of explosives were dropped on the city by 800 American and British aircraft. The firestorm created by the two days of bombing set the city burning for many more days, littering the streets with charred corpses, including many children. Eight square miles of the city were ruined, and the total body count was between 35,000 and 135,000 (an approximation is all that was possible given that the city was filled with many refugees from farther east). The hospitals that were left standing could not handle the numbers of injured and burned, and mass burials became necessary. Source: www.history.com.

#Dresden #PosterArt #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #art #paper #graphic #graphics #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #originalposter #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #graphicdesign #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

Today in History: Ernst Litfass born in 1816

Today in History: Ernst Litfass born in 1816

204 years ago today, German printer and publisher Ernst Litfass was born. Litfass is best known for his invention of the free-standing cylindrical advertising column – the Litfasssäule (Litfass Column) – that premiered in Berlin in 1855. During the first half of the 19th century, posters had seen a huge increase as a means of advertising. The uncoordinated posting of announcements and ads on homes, trees, walls, and any open street corner became a nuisance which resulted in a decree in 1849 that prohibited any placarding of posters with the exception of government notices. Litfass responded to the demand for a regulated system and signed a contract to erect special advertising columns throughout Berlin to address the problem. In return, he was granted exclusive rights for the display of the posters.

For inquiries, email posterconnection@gmail.com. #Litfass #PosterArt #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #art #paper #graphic #graphics #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #originalposter #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #graphicdesign https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8