Today in History: The Pen

Today in History: The Pen

75 years ago today, 1943, Hungarian-born László Biró received the first patent for the pen. Biró was a journalist who was frustrated with the use of the fountain pen: it took too much time to refill the ink and there seemed to be no way to avoid ink smudges. Biró noticed newspaper inks seemed to dry more quickly, thus rendering the paper stain free, and so he set out to design a pen using the same type of ink. He filed a British patent in 1938 and continued to develop and improve the pen’s design together with his brother György and their friend Juan Jorge Meynin. A new patent for the improved pen was filed in 1943: it was the first real ballpoint pen as we know it today. The pen became an immediate bestseller in the United States after World War II where it was first introduced in the fall of 1945 at a New York department store. Despite its high price of $9, some 10,000 pens were sold within the first week

#Bic #Pen #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #originalposter #poster #posters #design #graphicdesign #art #paper #graphic #graphics #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

Advertisements

Today in History: Fountain Pen patented 134 years ago

Today in History: Fountain Pen patented 134 years ago

On 12 February 1884, New York insurance salesman Lewis Waterman patented a groundbreaking invention, the fountain pen. Waterman’s instrument was a winner: it did not require constant dipping into the ink well and almost eliminated any ink spills. Writing instruments that contained their own ink supply already existed in the early 18th century. Today’s oldest surviving fountain pen was designed by the Frenchman M. Bion and dates back to 1702. The first American patent for a pen was awarded in 1809 to P. Williamson, a Baltimore shoemaker. After 1850, there was a steady stream of new fountain pen patents and pens in productions. But while early fountain pens were plagued by ink leaks and other failures that left them impractical to use and difficult to sell, it was Waterman’s patent that promoted the fountain pen to a widely popular writing instrument.

For inquiries, email posterconnection@gmail.com.

#FountainPen #PosterArt #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #art #paper #graphic #graphics #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #originalposter #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #graphicdesign #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

Today in History: The Pen

Today in History: The Pen

On June 10, 1943, Hungarian-born László Biró received the first patent for the pen. Biró was a journalist who was frustrated with the use of the fountain pen: it took too much time to refill the ink and there seemed to be no way to avoid ink smudges. Biró noticed newspaper inks seemed to dry more quickly, thus rendering the paper stain free, and so he set out to design a pen using the same type of ink. He filed a British patent in 1938 and continued to develop and improve the pen’s design together with his brother György and their friend Juan Jorge Meynin. A new patent for the improved pen was filed in 1943: it was the first real ballpoint pen as we know it today. The pen became an immediate bestseller in the United States after World War II where it was first introduced in the fall of 1945 at a New York department store. Despite its high price of $9, some 10,000 pens were sold within the first week

#VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #originalposter #poster #posters #design #graphicdesign #art #paper #graphic #graphics #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

 

Today in History: The Pen

Today in History: The Pen
On June 10, 1943, Hungarian-born László Biró received the first patent for the pen. Biró was a journalist who was frustrated with the use of the fountain pen: it took too much time to refill the ink and there seemed to be no way to avoid ink smudges. Biró noticed newspaper inks seemed to dry more quickly, thus rendering the paper stain free, and so he set out to design a pen using the same type of ink.

He filed a British patent in 1938 and continued to develop and improve the pen’s design together with his brother György and their friend Juan Jorge Meynin. A new patent for the improved pen was filed in 1943: it was the first real ballpoint pen as we know it today. The pen became an immediate bestseller in the United States after World War II where it was first introduced in the fall of 1945 at a New York department store. Despite its high price of $9, some 10,000 pens were sold within the first week.

#Pen #Biro #VintagePoster #VintagePosters https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8