Today in History: One million Beetles in 1955

Today in History: One million Beetles in 1955

65 years ago today, the one millionth VW Beetle came off its assembly line in Wolfsburg, Germany, where it is still on display at the Volkswagen Auto Museum.

For inquiries, email posterconnection@gmail.com.

#VW #VWBeetle #Volkswagen #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #art #poster #posters #design #graphicdesign #paper #graphic #graphics #originalposter #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

Today in History: Last classic VW Beetle rolls off the line in 2003

 

Today in History: Last classic VW Beetle rolls off the line in 2003

On this day in 2003, the last of 21,529,464 Volkswagen Beetles built since World War II rolls off the production line at Volkswagen’s plant in Puebla, Mexico. One of a 3,000-unit final edition, the baby-blue vehicle was sent to a museum in Wolfsburg, Germany, where Volkswagen is headquartered.

The car produced in Puebla that day was the last so-called “classic” VW Beetle, which is not to be confused with the redesigned new Beetle that Volkswagen introduced in 1998. (The new Beetle resembles the classic version but is based on the VW Golf.) The roots of the classic Beetle stretch back to the mid-1930s, when the famed Austrian automotive engineer Dr. Ferdinand Porsche met German leader Adolf Hitler’s request for a small, affordable passenger car to satisfy the transportation needs of the German people Hitler called the result the KdF (Kraft-durch-Freude)-Wagen (or “Strength-Through-Joy” car) after a Nazi-led movement ostensibly aimed at helping the working people of Germany; it would later be known by the name Porsche preferred: Volkswagen, or “people’s car.”

The first production-ready Kdf-Wagen debuted at the Berlin Motor Show in 1939; the international press soon dubbed it the “Beetle” for its distinctive rounded shape. During World War II, the factory in Kdf-stat (later renamed Wolfsburg) continued to make Beetles, though it was largely dedicated to the production of war vehicles. Production was halted under threat of Allied bombing in August 1944 and did not resume until after the war, under British control. Though VW sales were initially slower in the United States compared with the rest of the world, by 1960 the Beetle was the top-selling import in America, thanks to an iconic ad campaign by the firm Doyle Dane Bernbach. In 1972, the Beetle surpassed the longstanding worldwide production record of 15 million vehicles, set by Ford Motor Company’s legendary Model T between 1908 and 1927. It also became a worldwide cultural icon, featuring prominently in the hit 1969 movie “The Love Bug” (which starred a Beetle named Herbie) and on the cover of the Beatles album “Abbey Road.”

In 1977, however, the Beetle, with its rear-mounted, air-cooled-engine, was banned in America for failing to meet safety and emission standards. Worldwide sales of the car shrank by the late 1970s and by 1988, the classic Beetle was sold only in Mexico. Due to increased competition from other manufacturers of inexpensive compact cars, and a Mexican decision to phase out two-door taxis, Volkswagen decided to discontinue production of the classic bug in 2003. The final count of 21,529,464, incidentally, did not include the original 600 cars built by the Nazis prior to World War II.

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/last-classic-vw-beetle-rolls-off-the-line

For inquiries, email posterconnection@gmail.com.

#VW #Volkswagen #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #originalposter #poster #posters #design #graphicdesign #art #paper #graphic #graphics #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

Today in History: Volkswagen is founded in 1937

Today in History: Volkswagen is founded in 1937
83 years ago today, the German automobile manufacturer Volkswagen was established. The idea for a small, affordable family car was introduced years earlier by the engineer, Ferdinand Porsche, who wanted to create an automobile that was easy to build and inexpensive to buy. In 1933, Adolf Hitler got involved and contracted Porsche to design and build the Volkswagen (“People’s Car”) that could fit 2 adults and 3 children, drive 100 km/h (62 mph) and would cost no more than 1,000 Reichsmark (approx. $396). Hitler quickly funded the building of a brand-new Volkswagen factory to create Ferdinand Porsche’s design. Construction began on May 26, 1937. Volkswagen was founded two days later on May 28.

The People’s Car was to be made available to all German citizens through a state-sponsored savings plan at a price of 990 Reichsmark (comparable to the price of a small motorcycle at the time). The car was initially called a KdF-Wagen (Kraft durch Freude / Strength through Joy). But by the time the first cars had been produced – the KdF-Wagen was displayed for the first time at the Berlin Motor Show in 1939 – World War II started. All production was halted and re-focused on military vehicles. No cars were ever delivered through the savings plan. One early Type 1 convertible model was given to Hitler on his 50th birthday.

At the end of the war, with the factory plant in ruins, the Allies used Volkswagen to help revive the German auto industry and thus the success story of the VW Beetle began. In 1950, the “beetle”-shaped car sold for approx. 4000 Deutsche Mark (approx. $2000). In 1955, VW had produced its one millionth car. In 1972, the Beetle broke the long-standing worldwide production record of Ford’s legendary Model T with 15 million vehicles. By 2003, when the last original Beetle rolled off the production lines in Puebla, Mexico, almost 22 million Beetles had been sold in over 150 countries – a true world record.

For inquiries, email posterconnection@gmail.com.

#VW #Volkswagen #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #originalposter #poster #posters #design #graphicdesign #art #paper #graphic #graphics #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor https://goo.gl/YC5rQA

Today in History: Last German VW Beetle produced in 1978

Today in History: Last German VW Beetle produced in 1978

The end of the German production of the Beetle: On January 19, 1978 the last model of the legendary car rolls off the assembly lines at the Volkswagen plant in Emden, Germany. Here is a link to a short blog about the VW Beetle: http://wp.me/p6cafs-N

For inquiries, email posterconnection@gmail.com.

#VW #Beetle #PosterArt #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #art #paper #graphic #graphics #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #originalposter #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #graphicdesign https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

Today in History: One million Beetles in 1955

Today in History: One million Beetles in 1955

64 years ago today, the one millionth VW Beetle came off its assembly line in Wolfsburg, Germany, where it is still on display at the Volkswagen Auto Museum.

For inquiries, email posterconnection@gmail.com.

#VW #VWBeetle #Volkswagen #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #art #poster #posters #design #graphicdesign #paper #graphic #graphics #originalposter #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

Today in History: Last classic VW Beetle rolls off the line in 2003

Today in History: Last classic VW Beetle rolls off the line in 2003

On this day in 2003, the last of 21,529,464 Volkswagen Beetles built since World War II rolls off the production line at Volkswagen’s plant in Puebla, Mexico. One of a 3,000-unit final edition, the baby-blue vehicle was sent to a museum in Wolfsburg, Germany, where Volkswagen is headquartered.

The car produced in Puebla that day was the last so-called “classic” VW Beetle, which is not to be confused with the redesigned new Beetle that Volkswagen introduced in 1998. (The new Beetle resembles the classic version but is based on the VW Golf.) The roots of the classic Beetle stretch back to the mid-1930s, when the famed Austrian automotive engineer Dr. Ferdinand Porsche met German leader Adolf Hitler’s request for a small, affordable passenger car to satisfy the transportation needs of the German people Hitler called the result the KdF (Kraft-durch-Freude)-Wagen (or “Strength-Through-Joy” car) after a Nazi-led movement ostensibly aimed at helping the working people of Germany; it would later be known by the name Porsche preferred: Volkswagen, or “people’s car.”

The first production-ready Kdf-Wagen debuted at the Berlin Motor Show in 1939; the international press soon dubbed it the “Beetle” for its distinctive rounded shape. During World War II, the factory in Kdf-stat (later renamed Wolfsburg) continued to make Beetles, though it was largely dedicated to the production of war vehicles. Production was halted under threat of Allied bombing in August 1944 and did not resume until after the war, under British control. Though VW sales were initially slower in the United States compared with the rest of the world, by 1960 the Beetle was the top-selling import in America, thanks to an iconic ad campaign by the firm Doyle Dane Bernbach. In 1972, the Beetle surpassed the longstanding worldwide production record of 15 million vehicles, set by Ford Motor Company’s legendary Model T between 1908 and 1927. It also became a worldwide cultural icon, featuring prominently in the hit 1969 movie “The Love Bug” (which starred a Beetle named Herbie) and on the cover of the Beatles album “Abbey Road.”

In 1977, however, the Beetle, with its rear-mounted, air-cooled-engine, was banned in America for failing to meet safety and emission standards. Worldwide sales of the car shrank by the late 1970s and by 1988, the classic Beetle was sold only in Mexico. Due to increased competition from other manufacturers of inexpensive compact cars, and a Mexican decision to phase out two-door taxis, Volkswagen decided to discontinue production of the classic bug in 2003. The final count of 21,529,464, incidentally, did not include the original 600 cars built by the Nazis prior to World War II.

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/last-classic-vw-beetle-rolls-off-the-line

For inquiries, email posterconnection@gmail.com.

#VW #Volkswagen #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #originalposter #poster #posters #design #graphicdesign #art #paper #graphic #graphics #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

Today in History: Volkswagen is founded in 1937

Today in History: Volkswagen is founded in 1937
82 years ago today, the German automobile manufacturer Volkswagen was established. The idea for a small, affordable family car was introduced years earlier by the engineer, Ferdinand Porsche, who wanted to create an automobile that was easy to build and inexpensive to buy. In 1933, Adolf Hitler got involved and contracted Porsche to design and build the Volkswagen (“People’s Car”) that could fit 2 adults and 3 children, drive 100 km/h (62 mph) and would cost no more than 1,000 Reichsmark (approx. $396). Hitler quickly funded the building of a brand-new Volkswagen factory to create Ferdinand Porsche’s design. Construction began on May 26, 1937. Volkswagen was founded two days later on May 28.

The People’s Car was to be made available to all German citizens through a state-sponsored savings plan at a price of 990 Reichsmark (comparable to the price of a small motorcycle at the time). The car was initially called a KdF-Wagen (Kraft durch Freude / Strength through Joy). But by the time the first cars had been produced – the KdF-Wagen was displayed for the first time at the Berlin Motor Show in 1939 – World War II started. All production was halted and re-focused on military vehicles. No cars were ever delivered through the savings plan. One early Type 1 convertible model was given to Hitler on his 50th birthday.

At the end of the war, with the factory plant in ruins, the Allies used Volkswagen to help revive the German auto industry and thus the success story of the VW Beetle began. In 1950, the “beetle”-shaped car sold for approx. 4000 Deutsche Mark (approx. $2000). In 1955, VW had produced its one millionth car. In 1972, the Beetle broke the long-standing worldwide production record of Ford’s legendary Model T with 15 million vehicles. By 2003, when the last original Beetle rolled off the production lines in Puebla, Mexico, almost 22 million Beetles had been sold in over 150 countries – a true world record.

For inquiries, email posterconnection@gmail.com.

#VW #Volkswagen #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #originalposter #poster #posters #design #graphicdesign #art #paper #graphic #graphics #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA

Today in History: Last German VW Beetle produced in 1978

Today in History: Last German VW Beetle produced in 1978

The end of the German production of the Beetle: On January 19, 1978 the last model of the legendary car rolls off the assembly lines at the Volkswagen plant in Emden, Germany. Here is a link to a short blog about the VW Beetle: http://wp.me/p6cafs-N

For inquiries, email posterconnection@gmail.com.

#VW #Beetle #PosterArt #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #art #paper #graphic #graphics #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #originalposter #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #graphicdesign #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

Today in History: One million Beetles in 1955

Today in History: One million Beetles in 1955

63 years ago today, the one millionth VW Beetle came off its assembly line in Wolfsburg, Germany, where it is still on display at the Volkswagen Auto Museum.

For inquiries, email posterconnection@gmail.com.

#VW #VWBeetle #Volkswagen #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #art #poster #posters #design #graphicdesign #paper #graphic #graphics #originalposter #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8

Today in History: Last classic VW Beetle rolls off the line in 2003

Today in History: Last classic VW Beetle rolls off the line in 2003

On this day in 2003, the last of 21,529,464 Volkswagen Beetles built since World War II rolls off the production line at Volkswagen’s plant in Puebla, Mexico. One of a 3,000-unit final edition, the baby-blue vehicle was sent to a museum in Wolfsburg, Germany, where Volkswagen is headquartered.

The car produced in Puebla that day was the last so-called “classic” VW Beetle, which is not to be confused with the redesigned new Beetle that Volkswagen introduced in 1998. (The new Beetle resembles the classic version but is based on the VW Golf.) The roots of the classic Beetle stretch back to the mid-1930s, when the famed Austrian automotive engineer Dr. Ferdinand Porsche met German leader Adolf Hitler’s request for a small, affordable passenger car to satisfy the transportation needs of the German people Hitler called the result the KdF (Kraft-durch-Freude)-Wagen (or “Strength-Through-Joy” car) after a Nazi-led movement ostensibly aimed at helping the working people of Germany; it would later be known by the name Porsche preferred: Volkswagen, or “people’s car.”

The first production-ready Kdf-Wagen debuted at the Berlin Motor Show in 1939; the international press soon dubbed it the “Beetle” for its distinctive rounded shape. During World War II, the factory in Kdf-stat (later renamed Wolfsburg) continued to make Beetles, though it was largely dedicated to production of war vehicles. Production was halted under threat of Allied bombing in August 1944 and did not resume until after the war, under British control. Though VW sales were initially slower in the United States compared with the rest of the world, by 1960 the Beetle was the top-selling import in America, thanks to an iconic ad campaign by the firm Doyle Dane Bernbach. In 1972, the Beetle surpassed the longstanding worldwide production record of 15 million vehicles, set by Ford Motor Company’s legendary Model T between 1908 and 1927. It also became a worldwide cultural icon, featuring prominently in the hit 1969 movie “The Love Bug” (which starred a Beetle named Herbie) and on the cover of the Beatles album “Abbey Road.”

In 1977, however, the Beetle, with its rear-mounted, air-cooled-engine, was banned in America for failing to meet safety and emission standards. Worldwide sales of the car shrank by the late 1970s and by 1988, the classic Beetle was sold only in Mexico. Due to increased competition from other manufacturers of inexpensive compact cars, and a Mexican decision to phase out two-door taxis, Volkswagen decided to discontinue production of the classic bug in 2003. The final count of 21,529,464, incidentally, did not include the original 600 cars built by the Nazis prior to World War II.

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/last-classic-vw-beetle-rolls-off-the-line

Inquiries about this original, vintage poster at posters@posterconnection.com

#VW #Volkswagen #VintagePoster #VintagePosters #vintage #originalposter #poster #posters #design #graphicdesign #art #paper #graphic #graphics #artoftheday #picofhteday #fun #cool #posterconnection #vintagefinds #interiordesign #vintagehome #vintagedecor #designporn https://goo.gl/YC5rQA https://goo.gl/GXcrV8